Disregard whatr Pitchfork-worshipping suburbanite Apple fanatics have heard about this record, and also disregard that your fearless, handsome A&E senior editor (of at least, 50% of Yr Rad Editorship) has neglected to post for over a month. Nothing’s LP, Guilty of Everything, destroys. Sure, it’s nestled in between trends: the “emo revival” that never needed any true lexical resuscitation — well, unless you shift the focus from preteen Hot Topic wahbulance riders to someone who’s actually heard Diary — and the “soft grunge” vomitorium born and bred on this website by girls with pallid faces and a vinyl version of Basement’s Colourmeinkindness whirring on a Crosley machine from Urban Outfitters in the corner.

Luckily for Nothing, their sound uproots both of these subcultural phenomena and transports it far beyond the nostalgia-minded agendas that these two genre clusters try to cling to. At times searching, at others crushing and haunting, Guilty of Everything is worth your time. Stream the title track above. You have Nothing to lose. Pardon the pun.

I’ll see myself out until after Modern Baseball makes me cry in April.

— James

It’s been a long time since an album has torn me up this badly. 

Mark Kozalek, the singer-guitarist behind Sun Kil Moon, has been making moody, nylon-string guitar driven folk songs for a while now, and has released a substantial number of albums that are worth checking out, but never, never has he made anything this stark, beautiful, and utterly devastating. 

Benji, an album wholly about death, is not something you can put on casually, in the background. The stories contained within take on a life of their own, screaming out for your attention, your concern. It is written as if the literary curtain that often acts as a buffer between artist and audience has been torn clean, bringing you face to face with the realities of the artist’s life. It is conversational yet through repetition it takes on the mystical aura of a folk tale. 

It’s an album you should listen to, in both the literal and figurative sense. Most of all, it is an album that deserves time and rewards it immensely. 

Egregious spelling error aside, U.K.-based neo-grunge revivalists Basement are back, following a two-year hiatus that makes Tigers Jaw and their brief respite seem like a cruel joke (probably because it was one — but I never saw that coming). Here’s a tour poster for this August, which probably will come packaged with a new track in the upcoming months. The last we heard from the band, Colourmeinkindness, ushered in this whole “soft grunge” movement, and Tumblr, you’ve never been the same since. Run for Cover Records, get ready for a well-placed vinyl preorder from me whenever it’s announced.
— James

Egregious spelling error aside, U.K.-based neo-grunge revivalists Basement are back, following a two-year hiatus that makes Tigers Jaw and their brief respite seem like a cruel joke (probably because it was one — but I never saw that coming). Here’s a tour poster for this August, which probably will come packaged with a new track in the upcoming months. The last we heard from the band, Colourmeinkindness, ushered in this whole “soft grunge” movement, and Tumblr, you’ve never been the same since. Run for Cover Records, get ready for a well-placed vinyl preorder from me whenever it’s announced.

— James

Mac Miller releasing a straight-faced cover of a Bright Eyes song certainly seems like another self-consciously cool attempt to put distance between the lunkheaded white-privilege rap that made him famous and the soul-searching stoner music that’s slowly earning him attention from more discriminating fans and tastemakers. And it is, to some degree, but Miller’s heartache is deeply felt, giving the impression that the cover is more a projection of an emotional state than an assertion of good taste. His cigarette-scorched rasp is a nice vehicle for Conor Oberest’s subway doldrums, and though the Internet’s reaction has been perplexed and cynical, Miller doesn’t appear too worried about how he’s perceived. 

- Jack

Here we have two contrivance-free gangster rappers executing a style that’s rapidly losing it’s traction in the mainstream. Gucci Mane is locked up indefinitely. Waka Flocka Flame’s Flockaveli 2 is delayed indefinitely. T.I. is too busy redeeming himself on VH1 to record music. The Chicago Drill scene has struggled to regain the national attention that spawned from the success of Keef’s fiercely-debated 2012 debut Finally Rich. Rick Ross, who’s been the closest thing to a commercially reliable gangster rapper over the last half-decade, can’t strum up any semblance of excitement for his upcoming Mastermind album. The only streetwise artists getting anywhere are those who can get their hands on DJ Mustard beats (YG, Young Jeezy) or affect a liquefied auto-tuned warble (Future, Rich Homie Quan, Young Thug). So it’s refreshing to hear Meek Mill, the most searingly emotional rapper working, and Yo Gotti lean hard into Cardo’s gaping low-end. It’s also a slightly sad, because this song will never catch outside of the HotNewHipHop/WorldStarHipHop universe, where unembellished street rap still has some clout.

-Jack

Move that Dope, a recently released track by Future, is the coming together of a typical Hip-Hop fan’s ideal dietary staples, as well as a few rare treats.

On one hand you have Future, the current holder of the “king of auto-tune Rap” title, giving a solid performance and one that we have come to expect from him. Over the past few years Future has carved a market out for his weird style, an approach to rapping that is sometimes melodic, sometimes hoarse, usually messy and almost always creepy as hell. Move that Dope finds him rapping about drugs, as he sometimes likes to do, in his typical staccato fashion. You don’t really know what he’s saying, but damn does it sound good.  

Move that Dope is Pusha T in his element. Rapping about selling cocaine is what T does best, and he is able to thrive even more if, like this track, there are minimal elements to distract him from that goal. 

As a bonus, Pharrell shows up randomly for a verse. He really should drop a rap album. “Get Lucky” was great, but the man’s got better bars than Fort Knox. Get your sh*t togehter Skateboard P. 

The central highlight of the track, however, is the beat. Dirty, industrial, grinding steadily, the beat, produced by Mike Will Made It, is an excellent foil for the drug pushing lyrics. It’s nice to see Mike Will step out of his comfort zone, which is, for all intents and purposes, cranking out quality club bangers (also Bangerz), and the off-tune high-register synths and stabs of Casio-keyboard horns add a nice sinister touch.

Besides the hook, which starts out repetitive and just get’s even more repetitive, the track is absolutely water-proof, and is a nice appetizer for Future’s upcoming album Honest, out sometime early this year. 

-Will M.

Glee Star Shines Bright                                                                                           Lea Michele proves once again that she is a force to be reckoned with as her debut albumLouder is set to come out on March 4. Her lead singles “Cannonball” and “Battlefield” prove that she has truly found her voice. Cannonball is a pop track that is about letting go and being free. With lyrics like: “I’ll fly, I’ll fly, I’ll fly like a cannonball” Lea highlights her perseverance after the death of her boyfriend Cory Monteith. “Battlefield” is a powerful ballad that addresses the conflict that can arise between a couple. It’s an emotional track that assesses the implications of being at war in a relationship. There is no doubt that Lea has an amazing voice and a bright future ahead of her. 

-Laura A. 

Bruno Mars’s 1970s-style music video for his 1950s-era love ballad with a powerful modern twist will never get old. This is particularly true after his fantastic Super Bowl appearance; can this guy get any better? Don’t worry Bruno, if none of those other hoes work out, I’d be happy to be the model for one of your soulful, melodically catchy, wonderfully sweet love ballads. I promise not to dance with another man, as long you buy me flowers and hold my hand!

~Candace

Seahaven’s Winter Forever is one of those records that could the digital era’s answer to the Cure’s Pornography. It’s unashamedly dark, cold (pun intended, I guess), and bold. And sure, Run for Cover Records is home to some moody, under-the-bridge material (Basement’s Colourmeinkindness, Citizen’s Youth, even Cloakroom’s experimental Infinity), but the second LP from the group should be a sea change, and a haven. Man, the Cav Daily should fire me.

Just announced today, Reverie Lagoon: Music for Escapism Only has already showcased a more ethereal, indie-minded sound than its predecessor. The blissful “Silhouette (Latin Skin)”, which currently resides in my 7” crate with awesome B-sides, is a far cry from the slicing attitude of Winter.

The album drops 3/25 on TWO LP’s. Stoked.

— James

Shlohmo @ Old Cabell Hall

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This Saturday evening at 7, Old Cabell is going to get real weird.

The guy’s name is Henry Laufer and he makes beats. He dropped out of college to make an album armed with only “a Macbook” and “a couple of blunts.” He released the album, Bad Vibes, under the name Shlohmo. Everybody loved it. Why they loved it, however, is difficult to explain.

Bad Vibes came out during a time where numerous electronic Hip-Hop producers were following along in the footsteps of LA-beat scene pioneer Flying Lotus, trying to ride his massive wake for a little personal gain, but despite the fact that the album fits nicely into this categorization, it was also fundamentally different, and stood out from the crowd at the time. 

While others made weird must for it’s own sake, Shlohmo relied on unusual instrumentation, field recordings and obsolete equipment to make weird sounds that made you feel things that you can’t get across using the tool set you are allowed to use if you want to fit in. Bad Vibes, I think, resonates with people because they have never heard something quite like it, and because of this, if you have never, or only briefly, heard Shlohmo, I highly recommend that you spend the $5 to go see him this Saturday.

Yes, it is going to be weird. This weirdness is only compounded by the fact that the show is seated, that is taking place in the very ceremonial Old Cabell Hall, and the fact that Shlohmo may drop “Throw Some D’s” by Rich Boy (See Shlohmo’s Boiler Room set if you want to see what I mean). The below track is a personal favorite of mine. It is weird. And it makes me feel. It makes me feel a lot of things.

Anyway.

Go see the show.

-Will M.